Spatial Distribution and Conservation of Speckled Hind and Warsaw Grouper in the Atlantic Ocean off the Southeastern U.S.

PLOS ONE, 19 November 2013

By Nicholas A. Farmer and Mandy Karnauskas

“There is broad interest in the development of efficient marine protected areas (MPAs) to reduce bycatch and end overfishing of speckled hind (Epinephelus drummondhayi) and warsaw grouper (Hyporthodus nigritus) in the Atlantic Ocean off the southeastern U.S. We assimilated decades of data from many fishery-dependent, fishery-independent, and anecdotal sources to describe the spatial distribution of these data limited stocks. A spatial classification model was developed to categorize depth-grids based on the distribution of speckled hind and warsaw grouper point observations and identified benthic habitats. Logistic regression analysis was used to develop a quantitative model to predict the spatial distribution of speckled hind and warsaw grouper as a function of depth, latitude, and habitat.

Point and spawning observations.

Point and spawning observations.

“Models, controlling for sampling gear effects, were selected based on AIC and 10-fold cross validation. The best-fitting model for warsaw grouper included latitude and depth to explain 10.8% of the variability in probability of detection, with a false prediction rate of 28–33%. The best-fitting model for speckled hind, per cross-validation, included latitude and depth to explain 36.8% of the variability in probability of detection, with a false prediction rate of 25–27%. The best-fitting speckled hind model, per AIC, also included habitat, but had false prediction rates up to 36%. Speckled hind and warsaw grouper habitats followed a shelf-edge hardbottom ridge from North Carolina to southeast Florida, with speckled hind more common to the north and warsaw grouper more common to the south. The proportion of habitat classifications and model-estimated stock contained within established and proposed MPAs was computed. Existing MPAs covered 10% of probable shelf-edge habitats for speckled hind and warsaw grouper, protecting 3–8% of speckled hind and 8% of warsaw grouper stocks. Proposed MPAs could add 24% more probable shelf-edge habitat, and protect an additional 14–29% of speckled hind and 20% of warsaw grouper stocks.”

Spatial and Temporal Analysis of Human Infection with Avian Influenza A(H7N9) Virus in China, 2013

Eurosurveillance, Volume 18, Issue 47, 21 November 2013

By W. Liu, K. Yang, X. Qi, K. Xu, H. Ji, J. Ai, A. Ge, Y. Wu, Y. Li, Q Dai, Q. Liang, C. Bao, R. Bergquist, F. Tang, and Y. Zhu

“Descriptive and geographic information system methods were used to depict the spatial and temporal characteristics of the outbreak of human infection with a novel avian influenza A(H7N9) virus in mainland China, the peak of which appeared between 28 March and 18 April 2013. As of 31 May 2013, there was a total of 131 reported human infections in China, with a cumulative mortality of 29% (38/131). The outbreak affected 10 provinces, with 106 of the cases being concentrated in the eastern coastal provinces of Zhejiang, Shanghai and Jiangsu.

ZHU_fig3

“Statistically significant spatial clustering of cumulative human cases was identified by the Cuzick–Edwards’ k-nearest neighbour method. Three spatio-temporal clusters of cases were detected by space–time scan analysis. The principal cluster covered 18 counties in Zhejiang during 3 to 18 April (relative risk (RR): 26.39;p<0.0001), while two secondary clusters in March and April covered 21 counties along the provincial boundary between Shanghai and Jiangsu (RR: 6.35;p<0.0001) and two counties in Jiangsu (RR: 72.48;p=0.0025). The peak of the outbreak was in the eastern coastal provinces of Zhejiang, Shanghai and Jiangsu that was characterised by statistically significant spatio-temporal aggregation, with a particularly high incidence in March and April 2013.”

Connect with Thought Leaders at the 2014 Geodesign Summit

geodesign-logoSee How Using Geospatial Technology for Sustainable Design Will Shape the Future

Planning and design professionals from local government, landscape architecture, architecture, health, engineering, and academia will gather at Esri headquarters in Redlands, California, January 29–30, 2014, for the fifth annual Geodesign Summit. The event is open to anyone interested in finding innovative design solutions to address today’s major challenges. This year’s event will explore the use of geodesign for the planning of sustainable and resilient cities.

Geodesign—the blending of science, technology, and design—has taken off around the world with growing numbers of conferences and educational degree programs.

“Wherever I travel in the US, Asia, and Europe, people are saying we need holistic, integrative, evidence-based planning and design if we are going to solve the world’s biggest challenges,” said Shannon McElvaney, global industry manager of community development at Esri. “We are moving beyond the siloed thinking of the past. People who attend the Geodesign Summit want to share their ideas and learn how they can apply geodesign thinking and tools to their work.”

Attendees will have many opportunities to get involved. Hands-on training, featured speakers, stimulating discussions, and Lightning Talks will be offered. New to this year’s summit are preconference workshops taught by leading geospatial and design evangelists. In addition to a welcome social, networking breaks, and lunches, attendees will be able to further connect with others during the summit party on the last night of the event.

Featured speakers in this year’s lineup include the following: Chris Markuson, director of economic development for Pueblo County, Colorado, will speak on how he is using geodesign to secure funding to build a sustainable, resilient community in a former mining and steel town. David Early, principal of The Planning Center DC&E and an expert on smart growth and development, will speak about GreenScore, a methodology for evaluating the impacts of various planning scenarios to increase the health and sustainability of local communities. Will Rogers, president and CEO of The Trust for Public Land, will discuss ParkScore, a groundbreaking effort to analyze the accessibility of a city’s parks and open space to its citizens. He will introduce the new geodesign application that will allow city managers to increase their ParkScore rating. Carl Steinitz, professor emeritus, Harvard Graduate School of Design, will present a case study of his work done for Soma City, Japan, where geodesign was used to derive alternative plans against the constraints of flooding, radiation, rapid evacuation, and a shrinking population after the devastating earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear power plant disaster of 2011.

For more information and to register for the summit, visit geodesignsummit.com.

[Source: Esri press release]

URISA’s GISCorps Involved with Super Typhoon Haiyan Response

URISASuper Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda) made landfall early on November 8 in Guiuan municipality, Eastern Samar province, Eastern Visayas region in the Philippines. The storm hit with 150mph winds and gusts up to 170mph. Communications and power lines are down in many areas. Roads have been impacted, limiting access to the most affected areas. The Digital Humanitarian Network was activated by the UN Office for Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (UNOCHA).  URISA’s GISCorps is a member of DHNetwork and along with several other member organizations responded to this call. With assistance from Esri, members of GISCorps led by Dave Litke and Shoreh Elhami (Core Committee members), produced a series of web maps on ArcGIS Online from social media sources powered by MicroMappers and harvested and cleansed by volunteers from Stand By Task Force (SBTF) and Humanity Road. Examples of web maps are posted on the URISA GISCorps website.

Operating since 2003 as a program of the Urban and Regional Information Systems Association (URISA), GISCorps coordinates short-term, volunteer-based GIS services to underprivileged communities worldwide. GISCorps supports humanitarian relief, emergency response, health and education, local capacity building, and community development. Visit www.giscorps.org for additional information.

[Source: URISA news release]

URISA’s GIS Program Management Certified Workshop to be Offered Virtually

URISAURISA is pleased to announce the presentation of one of its most popular Certified Workshops, GIS Program Management, via instructor-led web based training.  URISA’s GIS Program Management workshop is regularly presented at URISA conferences, chapter events, and at regional conferences (last month in both Illinois and Kentucky). Normally a full-day classroom session, the workshop has been re-packaged into three sections and will be presented online this December to meet the constant demand for the subject matter without the travel expense and time away from work.  The workshop content is thoroughly peer-reviewed and updated each year and is eligible for GISP Education credit (8 hours of EDU-2).  (We’ve also applied for AICP continuing education credit for this course.)

“I highly recommend this workshop to my colleagues at SCAG and throughout our region.” – Javier Aguilar, PTP, Senior Regional Planner, Southern California Association of Governments

This 8-hour workshop will be presented over three days: 

  • Tuesday, December 3, 2013 – 1:00– 4:00 pm EST
  • Thursday, December 5, 2013  – 1:00– 4:00 pm EST
  • Thursday, December 10, 2013 – 1:00– 3:00 pm EST

Attendees will receive all of the benefits of traditional classroom learning in an interactive online classroom while not having the expense of traveling to onsite training locations.  Interactive communication between the instructor and other attendees is accomplished through communication tools within the training platform. Participants will receive an electronic workbook to accompany the instruction.

Cost: URISA International Members: $195 Non-members: $29

Course Description: Today, most government organizations have some type of GIS programs in place.  They vary from being in their early stages, to the rebuilding or tuning-up phase, to being completed changed as new technologies and applications emerge.  This workshop is designed to provide guidelines for managing your GIS program.  It will look at the various organizational and technical issues program managers must address in order to develop a successful GIS program.  The discussions will include managing all aspects of a GIS program from staffing and budgeting to procuring technology and working with vendors.  A variety of real world examples will be presented showing a range of GIS programs and their implementations.  This course presents an overview of successful and unsuccessful techniques for implementing GIS.

Specific topics include:

  • Program development
  • Project management techniques
  • Budgeting
  • Staffing
  • Sustaining program support
  • And managing consultants and vendors

Intended Audience:  GIS Program Management is a must for anyone embarking upon a GIS program, involved with a less-than-successful GIS, or who is seeking ways to improve a successful implementation.

Instructor Profile: Pete Croswell, PMP, GISP, ASPRS-CMS. Croswell-Schulte IT Consultants, Frankfort, KY. Peter Croswell, GISP, PMP is an expert in information technology and GIS implementation and management with 30 years experience as a GIS practitioner, GIS program manager, and consultant. Mr. Croswell currently serves as President of Croswell-Schulte Information Technology Consultants, an independent consulting firm specializing in GIS and IT program assessment, design, planning, project management, and implementation support. Previously, he was a consultant and company officer with PlanGraphics, Inc. and worked as an analyst and manager in charge of the Kentucky Natural Resources Information System (state of Kentucky). As a consultant, since the mid-1980s, he has provided support in GIS and IT planning and implementation to hundreds of public sector agencies, utility organizations, and private companies in the USA, Canada, Europe, the Middle East, and China. Mr. Croswell received a bachelor’s degree in geography and mathematics from the State University at Albany NY graduating magna cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa and Master’s degree in geography and geology from Western Illinois University. He has had extensive post-graduate education and training in GIS, IT, and public administration. Mr. Croswell is certified as a project management professional (PMP), ASPRS Certified Mapping Scientist, GIS Professional (GISP), and Microsoft Professional (MCP), and Master Web Designer. He is noted author and a former Board member and President of URISA International and is the principle author and instructor for URISA’s GIS Program Management Workshop. He is also the author of the recently published GIS Management Handbook which is now available for purchase from URISA.

Limited Participation: Sign up early as the online ‘classroom’ is limited to only 100 participants. Consider pulling your team together to participate in the workshop together.

If your schedule will not allow your attendance at all three sessions, note that the sessions will be recorded and archived for participants’ access.

Register today to reserve your spot!        

Additional Resource for Attendees: All attendees will also have the opportunity to purchase THE GIS MANAGEMENT HANDBOOK  (an additional textbook resource authored by Peter Croswell) at a considerable discount.

Climate Change and GIS: Resources for Action

Esri’s ArcGIS technology has a long history of driving environmental understanding and decision making. Policymakers, planners, scientists, and many others worldwide rely on GIS for data management and scientific analysis. GIS users represent a vast reservoir of knowledge, expertise, and best practices in applying this cornerstone technology to climate science, carbon management, renewable energy, sustainability, and disaster management.

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