Esri ELA Helps the European Environment Agency Support Decision Making

Three-Year Agreement to Improve Data Access for Effective Policy Making

The EEA will be able to provide access to data throughout Europe.

Working with Esri distributor Informi GIS A/S, the European Environment Agency (EEA) has signed a three-year Esri enterprise license agreement (ELA). This agreement will help the EEA deliver open access to data for more informed decision making about the environment. It will also improve integration of environmental considerations into economic policies, contributing to Europe’s sustainability efforts.

“Continuing to work with Esri and its partners allows us to deploy the technology necessary to support important initiatives efficiently and expediently,” says the EEA executive director Jacqueline McGlade.

The EEA is an established user of Esri’s geographic information system (GIS) technology. It signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with Esri in July 2010 for technology development, including cloud GIS. Under the new ELA, the EEA is able to share its environmental data more easily, allowing nations, agencies, scientists, and policy makers to view and analyze a wealth of data.

“The EEA has an impressive vision for using geographic data throughout its work to support better decision making,” says Esri president Jack Dangermond. “This ELA makes it possible to discover and analyze valuable information for both policy makers and the general public.”

During the next year, the EEA, Esri, and Informi GIS will work together to

  • Develop a cloud architecture serving the EEA’s initiatives and European Union (EU) directives.
  • Share data in line with the principles of EU’s Infrastructure for Spatial Information in Europe (INSPIRE) spatial data infrastructure initiative.
  • Create a collaborative plan that supports information sharing about the environment throughout Europe as part of the Eye on the Earth initiative.

To view and analyze the data the EEA has available, visit ArcGIS.com.

[Source: Esri press release]

Prioritizing Preferable Locations for Increasing Urban Tree Canopy in New York City

Cities and the Environment, 3(1), 2010

Locke, Dexter; Grove, J. Morgan; Lu, Jacqueline W.T.; Troy, Austin; O’Neil-Dunne, Jarlath P.M.; Beck, Brian.

“This paper presents a set of Geographic Information System (GIS) methods for identifying and prioritizing tree planting sites in urban environments. It uses an analytical approach created by a University of Vermont service-learning class called “GIS Analysis of New York City’s Ecology” that was designed to provide research support to the MillionTreesNYC tree planting campaign. These methods prioritize tree planting sites based on need (whether or not trees can help address specific issues in the community) and suitability (biophysical constraints and planting partners? existing programmatic goals). Criteria for suitability and need were based on input from three New York City tree-planting organizations. Customized spatial analysis tools and maps were created to show where each organization may contribute to increasing urban tree canopy (UTC) while also achieving their own programmatic goals. These methods and associated custom tools can help decision-makers optimize urban forestry investments with respect to biophysical and socioeconomic outcomes in a clear and accountable manner. Additionally, the framework described here may be used in other cities, can track spatial characteristics of urban ecosystems over time, and may enable further tool development for collaborative decision-making in urban natural resource management.”

Theme of Earth Science Week 2011 Announced

Earth Science Week 2011: Our Ever-Changing Earth, 9-15 October 2011

The American Geological Institute is pleased to announce the theme of Earth Science Week 2011: “Our Ever-Changing Earth.” This event will engage young people and the public in learning about the natural processes that shape our planet over time. Earth Science Week 2011 materials and activities will show how evidence of change can be found everywhere, from the earth beneath our feet to the oceans and atmosphere around us.

Earth Science Week offers opportunities to discover the Earth sciences and engage in responsible stewardship of the Earth. The program is supported by the U.S. Geological Survey, the AAPG Foundation, the U.S. Department of Energy, NASA, the National Park Service, Exxon Mobil, Esri, and other major geoscience groups.

URISA is Now Collecting Data for it’s Latest Salary Survey

URISA is now collecting data for it’s 2010-2011 Salary Survey for IT and GIS Professionals.  Similar to the salary surveys from 2003 and 2007, the survey will provide current information related to salary and responsibilities by employer type, geographic location, and professional GIS experience. This year’s survey will also provide information on how department sizes have changed, how organizations are utilizing the latest technology, and professional certification.

The purpose for collecting this information is to provide GIS and IT Professionals and hiring managers with insight on the current state of the job market in order to make more informed decisions regarding employment. The survey is open to all GIS and IT Professionals and is available at http://www.urisa.org/2010_salary_survey.

The anticipated publication date for the Salary Survey results will be October 2011.

Founded in 1963, URISA – The Association for GIS Professionals – is a leading provider of learning and knowledge for the GIS community. URISA is a multidisciplinary association where professionals from all parts of the spatial data community come together to share concerns and ideas.  For more information, please visit www.urisa.org or call 847-824-6300.

[Source: URISA press release]

Sea Level Rise Impacts Viewer from NOAA’s Coastal Services Center

“Being able to visualize potential impacts from sea level rise is a powerful teaching and planning tool, and the Sea Level Rise Viewer brings this capability to coastal communities. A slider bar is used to show how various levels of sea level rise will impact coastal communities. The initial project areas include Texas’ Houston and Galveston coasts and Mississippi, with additional coastal counties to be added in the near future. Visuals and the accompanying data and information cover sea level rise inundation, uncertainty, flood frequency, marsh impacts, and socioeconomics.”

Launch the viewer